Income protection - how deaf is deaf?

I'm new to the forum, so please excuse me if I am off tone. 

My hearing has only recently degenerated. I was first prescribed with hearing aids in 2016 when they were described as optional for my hearing loss. They aren't optional now! I need to wear them in all circumstances and I understand hearing loss does not improve with age. 

My hearing loss is symmetrical and described as moderate. I'm sure there are far more acute cases than mine. 

My work is in sales - in an office, on customer sites, in public environments like pubs, restaurants, conferences, trains, planes. 

I struggle with background noise, quiet speakers, people with strong accents, conference calls and any combination. But equally with my hearing aids in and in a quiet room with a person speaking clearly standing close by I have no problem. 

My questions:

I am told that the NHS hearing aids are as clear as any. You can buy more features but you won't buy better clarity. Is that true?

For best telephone quality I use my iPhone with a £100 Sennhauser headset and in-ear buds (without hearing aids). Would anything be better?

Finally, my company has an income protection policy (with Aviva) for those who fall long term sick and cannot perform their current job (not any job). Has anyone any experience of making a claim? Do I stand a chance?

Many thanks

Andrew

Parents
No Data
Reply
  • My work is in sales - in an office, on customer sites, in public environments like pubs, restaurants, conferences, trains, planes. 

    Sorry to say this but it is one of the toughest environments for deaf people. You'll have to really work at it in many ways but others have done it.

    I struggle with background noise, quiet speakers, people with strong accents, conference calls and any combination. But equally with my hearing aids in and in a quiet room with a person speaking clearly standing close by I have no problem. 



    This is absolutely standard. These are problems we all battle with.

    My questions:

    I am told that the NHS hearing aids are as clear as any. You can buy more features but you won't buy better clarity. Is that true?



    yes they will supply whatever equipment they think you need. You don't actually get a choice although you have some say in the matter. What happens is that you get your GP to refer you to ENT at a suitable hospital. They will take it from there.

    You will be tested for various aspects of your loss and they will then make a decision on what aid you need based on what you've told them. It will probably sound strange at first but if you don't get used to it you can go back any number of times to get adjustments made.

    For best telephone quality I use my iPhone with a £100 Sennhauser headset and in-ear buds (without hearing aids). Would anything be better?



    Annoyingly the experience is different for everyone. I usually suggest that people try everything and hang on to those that work. It has to be a direct comparison.

    Finally, my company has an income protection policy (with Aviva) for those who fall long term sick and cannot perform their current job (not any job). Has anyone any experience of making a claim? Do I stand a chance?



    Well a claim would begin with a report from an audiologist as to the extent of the loss. It's very much a before/after thing so you need to collect evidence that shows how much it has changed. Then you show how much your job has been affected and put forward a claim. People do succeed in these but it is a job for a professional.

Children
No Data